DYNAMIC YOGA PRACTICE AND EMOTIONS

TO PAUSE

“It’s a transformative experience to simply pause instead of immediately filling up the space. By waiting, we begin to connect with fundamental restlessness as well as fundamental spaciousness.”

P.33
KUNDTZ David in Quiet mind, Conari Press, Canada, 1977

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

NOT CAUSING HARM

“ Well-being of mind is like a mountain lake without ripples. When the lake has no ripples, everything in the lake can be seen. When the water is all churned up, nothing can be seen.

The still lake without ripples is an image of our minds at ease, so full of unlimited friendliness for all the junk at the bottom of the lake that we don’t feel the need to churn up the waters to avoid looking what’s there. Not causing harm requires staying awake.”

P.37
PEMA CHODRON in WHEN THINGS FALL APART, Heart advice for difficult times Ed. Shambhala, Boston,

 

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

STOP AND SMELL THE ROSES…

“There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting”.

Milan Kundera p.87
KUNDTZ David in Quiet mind, Conari Press, Canada, 1977

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

  YOGA IT JUST IS

“Life just is. You have to flow with it, give yourself to the moment. Let it happen.”

Jerry Brown, P.103.
KUNDTZ David in Quiet mind, Conari Press, Canada, 1977

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

Picture: Mariana Thieriot-Loisel

QUIETING YOUR DAY

“Got a problem to solve? Leave it and take a walk.

P.77
KUNDTZ David in Quiet mind, Conari Press, Canada, 1977

NOT KNOWING IS PART OF THE ADVENTURE

We can try to control the uncontrollable by looking for security and predictability, always hoping to be confortable and safe. But the truth is that we can never avoid uncertainty. This not knowing is part of the adventure, and it’s also makes us afraid.

Bodhichitta training offers no promise of happy endings. Rather, this “I” who wants to find security-who wants something to hold on – can finally learn to grow up. The central question (…) is not how we avoid uncertainty and fear, but how we relate to discomfort. How do we practice with difficulty, with our emotions, with the unpredictable encounters of an ordinary day?

P.6
PEMA CHODRON in WHEN THINGS FALL APART, Heart advice for difficult times Ed. Shambhala, Boston, 2000

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

LEARNING SELF-ESTEEM

“ When you have made good friends with yourself, your situation will be more friendly too”.

P.7
PEMA CHODRON in WHEN THINGS FALL APART, Heart advice for difficult times Ed. Shambhala, Boston, 2000

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

ACCEPTING TRANSITIONS

Life is a good teacher and a good friend. Things are always in transition, if we could only realize it. Nothing ever sums itself up in the way we like to dream about. The off-center,

In between state is an ideal situation, a situation in which we don’t get caught and we can open our hearts and mind beyond limit. It’s a very tender, non-aggressive, open-ended state off affairs.

To stay with that shakiness- to stay with a broken heart, with a rumbling stomach, with the feeling of hopelessness and wanting to get revenge- that is the path (…).

P.10
PEMA CHODRON in WHEN THINGS FALL APART, Heart advice for difficult times Ed. Shambhala, Boston, 2000

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

WE START WITH OURSELVES

In cultivating loving kindness, we train first to be honest, loving, and compassionate toward ourselves. Rather than nurturing self-denigration, we begin to cultivate a clear seeing-kindness. Sometimes we feel good and strong. Sometimes we feel inadequate and weak. But our loving-kindness is unconditional. No matter how we feel, we can aspire to be happy. We can learn to act and think in ways that sow seeds of future well being, gradually becoming more aware of what causes happiness as well as what causes distress. Without loving –kindness for ourselves it is very difficult, if not impossible, to genuinely feel it for others.

P.41
The pocket Pema Chodron, Shambhala, London 2008

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

OVERCOMMING UNWORTHINESS

Remind yourself, in whatever way is personally meaningful, that is not in your best interest to reinforce thoughts and feelings of unworthiness. Even if you’ve already taken the bait and feel the familiar pull of self-denigration, marshal your intelligence, courage, and humor in order to turn the tide. Ask yourself: Do I want to strengthen what I’m feeling now? Do I want to cut myself off from my basic goodness? Remind yourself that your fundamental nature is unconditionally open and free.

P.46
The pocket Pema Chodron, Shambhala, London 2008

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

 

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

BEYOND RIGTH AND WRONG

Compassionate action, being there for others, being able to act and speak in a way that communicates, starts with seeing ourselves when we start to make ourselves right or make ourselves wrong. At that particular point, we could just contemplate the fact that there is a larger alternative to either of those, a more tender, shaky kind of place where we could live. This place, if we can touch it, will help us to open further to whatever we feel, to open further rather than shut down more. We’ll find that as we begin to commit ourselves to this practice, as we begin to have a sense of celebrating the aspects of ourselves that we found so impossible before, something will shift permanently in us. Our ancient habitual patterns will begin to soften, and we’ll begin to see the faces and here the words of people who are talking to us.

P.48
The pocket Pema Chodron, Shambhala, London 2008

 

GIVING UP OF BEING PERFECT

“To live fully is to be always in no-man’s land”

There is something aggressive about that approach of life, trying to flatten out all the rough spots and imperfections into a nice smooth ride.

To be fully alive, fully human, and completely awake is to be continually thrown out of the nest. To live fully is to be always in no-man’s land, to experience each moment as

completely new and fresh. (…) We can give up on being perfect and experience each moment to the fullest. Trying to run away is never the answer to be a fully human being.

Running away from the immediacy of our experience is like preferring death to life.

P.72
PEMA CHODRON in WHEN THINGS FALL APART, Heart advice for difficult times Ed. Shambhala, Boston, 2000

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

DIFFICULTY IS INEVITABLE

On a very basic level all beings think that they should be happy. When life becomes difficult or painful, we think that something has gone wrong. According to the Buddhist teachings,

Difficulty is inevitable in human life. For one thing, we cannot escape the reality of death.

But there are also the realities of aging, of illness, of not getting what we want, and of getting what we don’t want. These kinds of difficulties are facts of life. Even if you were the Buddha himself, if you were a fully enlightened person, you would experience death, aging, and sorrow at losing what you love. All of these things would happen to you. If you got burned or cut, it would hurt.

But the Buddhist teachings also say that this is not what causes us misery in our lives. What causes misery is always trying to get away from the facts of life, always trying to avoid pain and sick happiness- this sense of ours that there could be lasting security and happiness available to us if we could only do the right thing.

It is so basic to think that things should go well for us, and that if we start to be depressed, lonely or inadequate, there’s been some kind of mistake or we’ve lost it. In reality when you feel depressed, lonely, betrayed, or any unwanted feelings, this is an important moment on the spiritual path. This is when real transformation can take place.

P.12
The pocket Pema Chodron, Shambhala, London 2008

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

MOVE TOWARD DIFFICULTY

Everything that occurs is not only usable and workable but is actually the path itself.

We can use everything that happens to us as the means for waking up. We can use everything that occurs- whether it’s our conflicting emotions and thoughts or seemingly outer situation- to show us where we are asleep and how we can wake up completely, without reservations.

P.12
The pocket Pema Chodron, Shambhala, London 2008

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

PRACTICING AT THE BEGINNING AND AT THE END OF THE DAY

In the morning when you wake up, reflect on the day ahead and aspire to use it to keep a wide-open heart and mind. At the end of the day, before going to sleep, think over what you’ve done. If you fulfilled your aspiration, even once, rejoice in that. If you went against your aspiration, rejoice that you are able to see what you did and are no longer living in ignorance. This way you will be inspired to go forward with increasing clarity, confidence and compassion.

The pocket Pema Chodron, Shambhala, London 2008

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

Picture: Patrick Loisel

HELLO, LIFE!

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